The world is experiencing rising temperatures due to human activities. Climate change has now become a threat to every facet of human existence.

Nature and humans will be affected by catastrophic warming if it is not controlled. This could result in worsening droughts, higher sea level rise, and mass extinction of species.

There are many solutions to the challenges we face, however.

The average temperature over many years is called climate. Climate change refers to a shift of these average conditions.

Humans using oil, coal, and gas for transport, homes and factories is causing the rapid climate change that we now see.

The greenhouse gasses that are released when fossil fuels are burned, mostly carbon dioxide (CO2), result from their combustion. These gases trap sunlight’s heat, causing the planet to experience an increase in temperature.

The Earth is about 1.2C cooler than in 1921. Furthermore, the atmospheric CO2 has increased by half.

Scientists warn that temperatures must fall if we are to avoid climate change’s worst effects. According to scientists, global warming should be controlled to 1.5C by 2100.

However, without further actions, global warming could continue to rise by at least 2C before the end of the century.

Scientists believe that global warming will exceed 4C if nothing is done. This could lead to catastrophic heatwaves and millions of people losing their homes due to rising sea levels, and irreversible loss in plant and animal species.

Extreme weather can be dangerous for lives and livelihoods, making them more severe.

As the climate continues to warm, certain regions will become increasingly uninhabitable. For example, farmland could turn into desert. Other regions are experiencing the reverse, with historic flooding caused by extreme rainfall, such as what was recently seen in China, Germany and Belgium.

Poorer people will be most affected by climate change because they don’t have enough money. Many farmers in the developing world already live with extreme heat and will continue to suffer from it.

The oceans, and their habitats, are also in danger. Due to warming seas and climate change, half the corals of Australia’s Great Barrier Reef have been lost since 1995.

As climate change makes it more likely for hot and dry weather to occur, wildfires will become more common.

As frozen ground in Siberia melts, the greenhouse gases that have been trapped for many centuries are released into the atmosphere. This will worsen climate change.

Animals will have a harder time finding the water and food they require in a warmer environment. Polar bears, for example, could be extinct as their ice melts, while elephants may have difficulty finding the 150 to 300 litres of water they require each day.

Scientists estimate that at most 550 species may be extinct this century, if nothing is done.

The effects of climate change can have different outcomes in different regions. Different regions will experience warmer temperatures than others. Some areas will get more rain while others may suffer from more severe droughts.

Temperature rises beyond 1.5C are unacceptable

  • The UKAnd Europe Extreme rainfall can cause flooding.
  • The following countries are included inMiddle East Heatwaves will hit and farms could be left deserted.
  • Islands in the Pacific RegionUnder rising seas, could vanish
  • Numerous African countries Are likely to experience food insecurity and droughts
  • In the west, drought conditions are possible USSome areas may experience stronger storms, but others will be more stable.
  • AustraliaIt is more likely that extreme heat or drought will occur.

Working together is the only way to combat climate change. This was clear in Paris 2015 in landmark agreement. They pledged to reduce global warming by 1.5C.

UK hosts COP26 in November. It is a global summit where world leaders will present their 2030 carbon reduction plans.

Many countries pledge to reach net zero by 2020. This involves reducing greenhouse gas emission as much as possible. It also means taking in an equal amount of the atmosphere.

Experts are unanimous in their belief that it is possible, however, governments and businesses will need to implement big changes.

While governments and business must make major changes, scientists believe that small adjustments in how we live can reduce our effect on the environment.

  • Fly less
  • You can live car-free, or you can use an electric vehicle
  • When washing machines need to be replaced, buy energy-efficient products such as washers
  • You can switch from a gas heating unit to an electric heatpump
  • Insulate your home.

The November COP26 climate summit, held in Glasgow, is crucial if we are to stop climate change. Nearly 200 countries will be asked about their plans for reducing emissions. This could have major implications on our lives every day.

  • The importance of the COP26 summit on climate change
  • How will you see climate change?
  • Can the UK achieve its climate targets?
  • Climate change and extreme weather

Getty Images top image. University of Reading and Prof Ed Hawkins. Climate stripes visualization.

Do you have any questions about climate changes?

Your question might be published. It will display your name, address, and date of birth, provided you do not state otherwise. We will not publish your contact details. We ask that you ensure that you read the following. terms & conditionsAnd Privacy Policy

This form allows you to submit your question.

If you are reading this page and can’t see the form you will need to visit the mobile version of the BBC website to submit your question or send them via email to [email protected] For any questions you send, be sure to include your name, address and age.

You may see your name, address, and birth date published in certain cases, provided you do not state otherwise. We will not publish your contact details. We ask that you ensure that you read the following. terms & conditionsAnd Privacy Policy

This form allows you to submit your question.

If you are reading this page and can’t see the form you will need to visit the mobile version of the BBC website to submit your question or send them via email to [email protected] For any questions you send, be sure to include your name, address and age.

Source: BBC.com

Share Your Comment Below

[gs-fb-comments]

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here